Monthly Archives: March 2018

Mendez v. Westminster: 72 Years Later

15 Mar
Sylvia Mendez
In the 1940s, more than 70 percent of all Mexican-American students in California attended “separate but equal” schools. And one court case changed that: Mendez v. Westminster (1946). Appalled that their three children—who were all fluent in English—were not permitted to attend a neighborhood school because it was for English-speaking students only, Gonzalo and Felicitas Mendez sued their local school district, setting into motion a series of changes to school segregation law. “Segregation… fosters antagonisms in the children and suggest...

School board members flock to Sacramento for Legislative Action Day

14 Mar
Sen. Steve Glazer with Region 7 members
On March 13, 2018, CSBA members from across the state attended CSBA’s annual Legislative Action Day to meet with lawmakers and advocate for public schools. More than 200 school board members held 103 meetings with Senators and Assemblymembers in the Capitol to push for the Full and Fair Funding of California’s public schools, discuss the pension crisis, talk about school facilities funding and inform their legislators about CSBA’s sponsored bills. The day also included legislative briefings from CSBA’s governmental relations...

The California Earned Income Tax Credit can help families in your district

13 Mar
By Joe Sanberg and Laura Capps As school board members, you help thousands of families every day in your community by working to ensure their children receive the best education possible. You also help kids grow up healthy and make sure they thrive by helping schools support their emotional, nutritional and social needs. Did you know that you can also help many low-income families meet their basic needs, such as transportation and housing, by helping them boost their income by...

Funding gaps persist in California school districts

7 Mar
pencils and coins
High-poverty school districts in California receive 2 percent less funding per student than more affluent districts when adjusted for student needs, a new report from The Education Trust determined. The discrepancy is part of a national trend of underfunding in large school districts serving large numbers of students of color and students from low-income families. “Across the country, we spend approximately 7 percent — or $1,000 — less per pupil on students educated in our nation’s highest-poverty districts than those...